Which film to use for color negatives

photonut

Active Member
I am interested in an M6 TTL and hoping to get a second hand one soon. I notice most of Leica users use slide film. I would be more interested in using color negatives. What do you recommend to make the best use of this wonderful camera?
 

mattinasi

Well-Known Member
Hello,

I actually use a lot of color negative film in my M7 - in fact i use it more than slides for color in that camera because I like the wider dynamic range.

I have tried a lot of films over the years, but here is what I prefer lately:

bright light: Fuji Reala (ISO 100) or Agfa Ultra 100 for highly saturated colors portraits: Fuji NPS (ISO 160) - this is one of my favorite films for rendering skin tones low light: Fuji Superia 800 or Fuji Press 800 - they are virtually identical to my eye mixed lighting: Agfa Vista 400

No, I do not work for Fuji :) I just like their color print films better lately. Kodak Portra is good, and I will use that without hesitation if I cannot find the Reala, NPS or Vista, but I think it it too expensive for what I get out of it. I think the Superia 800 is WAAAAY better than the Kodak Max stuff, which I avoid as much as possible. I have not tried Agfa's Vista 800 yet, but I hope to soon.

Anyway, that is my preference, but you might experiment and see what you like. The M lenses are fantastic and will extract every last drop of quality from the film - you will surprised at the quality you get from the negatives I think.

Cheers! - marc
 

photonut

Active Member
Thank you Marc for your recommendations. I will surely try them out. What about black and white? What do you use? The ones that can be processed by c-41. It's easier to drop the film off and less expensive.
 

photonut

Active Member
Thank you Marc for your recommendations. I will surely try them out. What about black and white? What do you use? The ones that can be processed by c-41. It's easier to drop the film off and less expensive. Ann
 

photonut

Active Member
Thank you Marc for your recommendations. I will surely try them out. What about black and white? What do you use? The ones that can be processed by c-41. It's easier to drop the film off and less expensive. Do you know of any good mail film developers? Ann
 

mattinasi

Well-Known Member
I do use some C41 B&W films, usually Ilford XP2 Super at ISO 250, but I much prefer to use old-school B&W film and develop it myself. Lately I am shooting Ilford Delta 100 and 400, processed in Ilford ID 11, and Ilford Pan-F processed in Agfa Rodinol. I like to play / experiment with B&W and developers, there are a lot of choices out there, and it is all fun :)

- marc
 
D

david40

B+W is easy to develop the negs, get them printed or scanned later if you like. Pan F is great, develop in Agfa Rodinal or Ilford Perceptol at 32 ISO for ultimate grain. Use a Paterson tank.
 

lcl

Member
Yes, I quite like to experiment with B&W. I only do it very occaisionly. My biggest problem is out-of-date and oxidised dedveloper.

Can anyone recommend any "one shot" developers? Years ago I used to use Neofin Red and Neofin Blue. Each dose came in a little glass bottle with a break-off top; the same kind as injectible pharmaceuticals used to come in. Does it still come like that?

Any other suggestions?

Alex
 

melhjt

Member
Hi Alex,

You seem to be referring to something so antiquated that I myself have not experienced before. What b/w film do you shoot? I'll recommend Agfa Rodinal. It's a liquid concentrate developer so you dont have to fumble around with powders and pre-mixing them. I find it very convenient and it works very well with Fuji Neopan 400.

Melvin H J Tan
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mattinasi

Well-Known Member
> Yes, Rodinol is excellent, and the concentrate lasts a long long time on the shelf. It provides very sharp negatives, but the grain is not as fine as with other developers I have used. But for the 1-roll a month usage pattern, Rodinol is great (the only real choice I know of, actually).

I like it best with Ilford Pan-F, but I use it with HP5 and Tri-X and Plus-X and whatever else I happen to shoot.

Cheers! - marc
 

lcl

Member
Hi Melvin I did some web research. Neofin still exists. see
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and I quote Tetenal Neofin Blue Developer Neofin Blue was created especially for Adox films by Schleussner Photowerke the creators of the Adox formula. Today the Adox films are made by Fotokemika and sold under the Efke name. This developer is a high acutance one shot formula designed for slow speed films. 5 one shot vials. Each can process 2 rolls of film.

also see
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I quote Tetenal Neofin Blue High acutance, compensating one-shot developer, useful when working with extended subject brightness range. Designed for slow & medium speed film. Available in 5 &s. (5x300-700ml) & 500ml.



Tetenal Neofin Red Modified version of Neofin Blue for high speed films. Available in 5 &ules (5x300-700ml on dilution) & 500ml concentrate.

I am now looking for an Australian supplier.

Any other one-shot developer suggestions?

Alex
 
H

hektor

Dear Alex,

The Tetenal agent in Australia is Vanbar Photographic in Carlton, Melbourne (03) 9347-7788.

The Tetenal website is
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Regards,

Justin
 
M

mholdef

I generally use Velvia and like its rich colours.

What negative film comes closest to Velvia in terms of saturation?

I've tried Kodak VC but think is less saturated and also Kodak Royal Supra but the saturation can even get a bit exagerated with certain colours.

Any advice welcome.

Kind regards,

Mark
 

jasdyh

Member
> [Trying again - didn't get it right the 1st time. I use Fuji Reala. It has an ISO of 100 and the prints are terrific. Jim] >
 

mattinasi

Well-Known Member
> YES! Fuji Reala is great stuff if you can shoot ISO 100; it is my standard film. For faster, I like Agfa Vista 200 and 400, and also the Fuji Superia 400 and 800. I find the processing is more of an issue than the film - if I use a good (expensive) lab almost any fresh film comes out good, but if I use a lousy (and inexpensive) lab they all come out so blah... I

Try Agfa Ultra 100 sometime too - it is loads of fun and VERY COLORFUL!

- marc
 

jasdyh

Member
> [Hi Mark When using a "good" lab for processing is there any special type of processing that is needed - particularly for Agfa? A long time ago I used Agfa film regularly and had access to a lab that used an Agfa process and the pictures were better than anything I have ever used. Unfortunately they closed some time ago and so I have swithed to the Reala and processing at a good lab that uses a Kodak process. Thanks in advance for your reply. Jim] >
 

mattinasi

Well-Known Member
Hi Jim,

I use only standard C-41 processing for color prints, nothing special like alternate processes... The big difference I find is the care of the people, and the quality of the processing machinery. For ex&le, one excellent minilab that I use has a nice Fuji Frontier machine and I get BEAUTIFUL results from them. They use fresh paper and chems and they take very good care of the negatives - but they charge $15.00 USD. Another lab I sometimes use, though I generally regeret it, is a local Costco store. They also have a Fuji Frontier machine, but they routinely scratch my negs and return to me dirty and bland prints - weak colors, and either too dark or too light. They only charge me $6.59 USD so it is a bargain, but not really because the pictures do not come out looking very good! Once in a while I will send out to the local Kodak lab that does overnight processing, but I get mixed results from them, even though they use the Kodak PerfectPrint system, I find my prints are often less than perfect.

Funny, I usually think of slide film as being 'fool-proof' from a processing perspective, but I just got back a roll of Kodak Ektachrome 100G that was ruined by the lab (Kodak). There was incredibly nasty reticulated grain everywhere and strange colors - they must have had chemical problems (or maybe I got a bad roll of film?) - what a dissapointment! I wish I had time to go back to doing my own processing...

The Agfa Ultra 100 is standard C-41 processed. The colors are bold and the contrast is high - not great for general purpose but a special film that I like to use when the light is flat, and there are not a lot of people shots to be taken.

Cheers!
- marc
 

jasdyh

Member
> Hi Marc Thanks for this very helpful info. Your experiences help me get a much better perspective on the processing componet and increases my appreciation for the local photo lab in Katonah, NY. Thanks again, Jim >
 
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